Tag Archives: Leveson Inquiry

How the free press threatens the UK’s media and political establishment

As we await the Leveson report, expected later this year, the debate over press regulation has intensified.  The allegations that have emerged after the Jimmy Savile investigations, Tom Watson’s question in Parliament, the resignation of the Director General of the … Continue reading

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The death of Daniel Morgan and the (im)possibility of Justice

A man who really fights for justice must lead a private, not a public, life if he is to survive for even a short time.” —Socrates, in Plato’s Apology, 31d–32a Daniel Morgan died with an axe in his face.  We … Continue reading

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Leveson’s fatal flaw: the Queen

Looking back on the Leveson Inquiry, it is clear that the review was fatally flawed from the start.  Although the terms of reference focused on the press, media relationship, the underlying issue was the way power is distributed and used … Continue reading

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Has the UK media’s abuse of the public interest stifled democracy?

Over the last few weeks, we have seen the Sun newspaper publish photographs of a naked Prince Harry. They justified publishing the photographs as being in the public interest.  Their defenders supported the decision by arguing that Prince Harry is … Continue reading

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Democracy and justice in the UK are we training to ask the right questions?

To find things out, we need to ask questions.  The quality of our questions will depend on what we already know. At the same time, the quality of our questions will decide the answers we get.  In court, we rely … Continue reading

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What is the public interest in an undeclared war? Leveson Inquiry connection to the Iraq War

Was the Iraq war a declared war that demonstrated an existential threat to the United Kingdom against which the public had to be consulted?  Lord Hennessy in his testimony to the Post Legislative Scrutiny of the Freedom of Information Act … Continue reading

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A modest defense of democracy: three cheers for Blair, Cameron, and Clinton

I am not convinced that Leveson Inquiry shows a diminished democracy.  Instead, we have been treated to an eye opening view of how modern democracy works.  In the past, much of this would not be known or understood. Like the … Continue reading

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Jay, Leveson, our modern day version of a Socratic dialogue

I have been enjoying the Leveson inquiry despite its depressing revelations. For many, what is of interest is seeing the powerful being brought to account.  For others, it is a chance to see the issues raised by phone hacking addressed.  … Continue reading

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Four questions Robert Jay failed to ask Rebekah Brooks and why they matter

The sessions with Rebekah Brooks proved interesting, but less exciting than the previous sessions with Rupert Murdoch. In large part, the sessions with Brooks and Coulson proved relatively less exciting because they are both facing criminal prosecution.  As a result, … Continue reading

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Meeting Murdoch: Political Influence always has a purpose.

When the bailiffs come to your home, you know the reason, you do not have to ask. I have never met Rupert Murdoch nor am I likely to meet him.  If we were to meet, especially if he were to … Continue reading

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