Author Archives: lawrence serewicz

About lawrence serewicz

An American living and working in the UK trying to understand the American idea and explain it to others. The views in this blog are my own for better or worse.

Why is the Queen silent on Hillsborough?

The Queen has not made a public statement about the Hillsborough finding of fact. Despite, 96 citizens being unlawfully killed, she is silent. In 2007 when 56 UK citizens died in a terrorist attack, she and other members of the … Continue reading

Posted in censorship, justice, philosophy, statesmanship | Tagged , , , , ,

Social media’s corrosive effect on UK Monarchy’s legitimacy

Since 2008, Her Majesty’s Government (HMG) has opened up a number of public inquiries into long running scandals that have been a cause of public anger. For decades, HMG resisted such calls. The official story had closed these events and … Continue reading

Posted in corruption, justice, philosophy, statesmanship, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Hillsborough and the cognitive dissonance of UK police response

In psychology there is a term called “cognitive dissonance”. The term refers to the symptoms a person faces when their behaviour does not match their thoughts, attitude, or beliefs. Cognitive dissonance refers to a situation involving conflicting attitudes, beliefs or … Continue reading

Posted in corruption | Tagged , , , , , | 4 Comments

To whom is the UK government accountable?

The question seems simple and the answer seems obvious. Yes, the UK government is accountable. If we understand being accountable as fitting one of the four types that Lord Sharman recommended, then it appears accountable.[1] giving an explanation providing further … Continue reading

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Does the United Kingdom have the rule of law?

‘Wherever law ends, tyranny begins’. –John Locke The question seems odd, almost quixotic. In a country that prides itself on Magna Carta with a long history of common law, it seems a question that need not be asked. this seems … Continue reading

Posted in corruption, Government, justice, public opinion, republicanism | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

Sir John Grieve and the Arcana Imperii: private accountability made public

Records in an archives create a public legacy to hold public official to account. As records allow powerful figures to be held to account, there can be a desire to control what is held and accessible in archives. In a … Continue reading

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Matthew Parris burnishes Boris Johnson’s leadership credentials

Yesterday Matthew Parris wrote a column attacking Boris Johnson for his behaviour and his success.[1] More importantly, he wrote about his success as a result of his behaviour. For many commentators, the column appeared devastating, cruel, well-deserved, destructive, and damaging. … Continue reading

Posted in Government, philosophy, statesmanship | Tagged , , , , ,

Institutional CSA, Critias and the Queen.

If you live under a tyrant, it can be difficult to criticize them. Even in the current age governments tolerate criticism only so long as it does not encourage physical violence. Even democratic governments, traditionally believed to be tolerant of … Continue reading

Posted in corruption, Government, justice, statesmanship | Tagged ,

Donald Trump’s imperial origins: a response to Eliot Cohen

Donald Trump is causing a stir. His success has unleashed the expected counter attack from the political establishment. In many ways he represents the final logic of the political establishment where its political immoderation is masked as effectiveness, fairness, and … Continue reading

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Who believes that no one ever looks the other way when abuse occurs?

We are told that various public figures, such as Edward Heath, could not have committed any of the crimes as they were surrounded with security. The police or security forces were present so such behaviour could not occur. If the … Continue reading

Posted in corruption, justice, philosophy, privacy, public opinion, public sector, statesmanship