Category Archives: statesmanship

The UK constitutional crisis: the death of liberal democracy

The United Kingdom faces a constitutional crisis created by the vote to leave the EU. The referendum outcome had many causes. For some, a quasi-Marxist view explains the outcome as caused by the recent financial crisis and the austerity that … Continue reading

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Who is a traitor in the UK? A short essay to answer the question.

In the recent attack on Jo Cox MP, the attacker is alleged to have said “Britain First”. At his appearance before the Magistrates, he said his name was “death to traitors!”[1] Following her death several claims appeared in social media … Continue reading

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Why Andrew Sullivan is wrong about America, Trump, and extreme democracy

In a provocative essay, Andrew Sullivan suggests America is an extreme democracy ripe for tyranny.[1] America’s multiculturalism, sexual freedom, disrespect for any authority or expertise and intolerance of any inequality whether earned or natural characterise its extremism. These characteristics challenge … Continue reading

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Should Caitlyn Jenner be Donald Trump’s Vice President?

On the surface, the pairing seems improbable if not impossible. What, if anything, do they have in common? They appear to share little except their celebrity status. Beneath the surface, though, they are animated by the same thing, a disordered … Continue reading

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Why is the Queen silent on Hillsborough?

The Queen has not made a public statement about the Hillsborough finding of fact. Despite, 96 citizens being unlawfully killed, she is silent. In 2007 when 56 UK citizens died in a terrorist attack, she and other members of the … Continue reading

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Social media’s corrosive effect on UK Monarchy’s legitimacy

Since 2008, Her Majesty’s Government (HMG) has opened up a number of public inquiries into long running scandals that have been a cause of public anger. For decades, HMG resisted such calls. The official story had closed these events and … Continue reading

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Matthew Parris burnishes Boris Johnson’s leadership credentials

Yesterday Matthew Parris wrote a column attacking Boris Johnson for his behaviour and his success.[1] More importantly, he wrote about his success as a result of his behaviour. For many commentators, the column appeared devastating, cruel, well-deserved, destructive, and damaging. … Continue reading

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Institutional CSA, Critias and the Queen.

If you live under a tyrant, it can be difficult to criticize them. Even in the current age governments tolerate criticism only so long as it does not encourage physical violence. Even democratic governments, traditionally believed to be tolerant of … Continue reading

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Donald Trump’s imperial origins: a response to Eliot Cohen

Donald Trump is causing a stir. His success has unleashed the expected counter attack from the political establishment. In many ways he represents the final logic of the political establishment where its political immoderation is masked as effectiveness, fairness, and … Continue reading

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Who believes that no one ever looks the other way when abuse occurs?

We are told that various public figures, such as Edward Heath, could not have committed any of the crimes as they were surrounded with security. The police or security forces were present so such behaviour could not occur. If the … Continue reading

Posted in corruption, justice, philosophy, privacy, public opinion, public sector, statesmanship